I love playing in the David Cross Band because it’s challenging. The music is hard to play and the calibre of the musicians is very high and if you take your eye off the ball for a moment you can be completely lost, but, over time, we’ve all learned to trust that somebody will pick up the baton and bring it all together somehow. That means that we can be creative and take risks. Because of this the music evolves and grows.

Everyone brings a lot of themselves to the band and we never tire of listening to each other. Paul is a technically astounding guitarist and composer with incredible emotional power, Mick is one of the best bass players around and writes and produces really new music for the band, Jinian holds the strings to all our hearts beating in time with his magnificent voice and Pat Garvey’s drumming brings extraordinary power, grace and authority to the team. David Jackson is the latest addition and he has transformed the way we relate to the audience - he is always communicating, even when he isn’t playing he is conducting or doing some strange dance or mime - he weaves an irresistible spell.

The music is often quite a journey and can be very emotional - we work very hard to achieve those spine-tingling moments on stage when the music lifts you and time stands still - but then we also laugh a lot - somehow it’s always a surprise when you play something just right (or completely wrong!)

I guess some things are just meant to be - and the David Cross Band is one of those things.

Two things to remember when playing in DCB (1) always play in time, even if it is 15/16, (2) don't forget your passport. I usually manage to achieve one of these fundamental tasks.

When I first joined DCB in 1995 after spending many years doing studio sessions, I was certainly overwhelmed by the bands incredible sense of time, ie not just playing in 4/4 and realized I had to get used to 'playing outside the box'.

The last DCB album 'Sign of the Crow' was for me a culmination of years of practicing, touring, writing, experimenting with different production techniques and generally listening to a very wide range of music.

I'm really looking forward to 2018/19 hopefully playing new music in new countries with a band that has such high technical ability, yet is always entertaining.

Hi, my name is Jinian Wilde, the vocalist and strangeling extraordinaire, with the fabulous David Cross Band.

Sometimes known as Jin Wilde or just Jin, I'm a singer, songwriter, studio vocalist, vocal instructor and musician (I play guitar) and I've worked with a great number of musical projects and with UK's Paris Music, providing backing vocals for artists requiring top quality BV tracks for their own projects. Following this I also founded Wilde Rose Studio. I have collaborated most notably with Uniting Nations, Daz Sampson and since 2007 I took the lead vocals role in the David Cross Band, touring Europe and the UK and recording with David on the Sign of the Crow release.

I'm a Strangeling, and as such I love to sing (we Strangelings do really love to sing... a lot... as much as possible really!).

I also enjoy Arts and Crafts, especially drawing and messing about with colour... How Strange! ;)

Strangely enough, everything else about me is probably too strange to mention... so i'll leave it there...

I love playing in The David Cross Band and I'm very thankful to be able to do what I do. The opportunity to play such exciting and challenging music with the wonderful musicians and lovely people in this band sums up why.

DCB is a superb project to work with and I also complement my live work as a freelance player, busy all-year round playing and touring with various other acts. These include The Prototypes (Get Hype Records), The DGB (Power of Three Records) and I've played with artists including but not limited to Noel Redding (Jimi Hendrix), JAMES, David Jackson (Van Der Graaf Generator), Tim Booth, Freddie V (Average White Band), Lewis Stephens (Freddie King) and Fischer-Z.

I like to think I have a few strings to my bow; I come from a classical background, starting my musical journey on the cello at the age of four. Now, many years later, I’m also a published author. My first book Lawless was published in 2016 to coincide with the release of my album of the same title.

I've written over 100 articles for various drum magazines (you’ll find my own column in the iconic ‘Rhythm Magazine’). I’m privileged to be Head of Drums at BIMM and also, as an educator, I’ve written music degree course notes, used by some of the top popular music education providers in the world.

I love running Master Study Studios in Brighton where I have students that come to study with me from all over the UK & Europe. Some of my current and past students include Ben Thompson (Two Door Cinema Club), Joao Caetano (Leona Lewis, Incognito), Rufus Taylor (The Darkness, We Will Rock You, Jeff Beck, Bryan May, Queen), Perry Melius (Billy Ocean, Tricky), James Stewart (Vader), Adam Pitts (Lawson), Deborah Knox-Hewson (Charlie XCX), and Ben Thomas (Rag ‘n’ Bone Man) to name just a few.

My second album set for release toward the end of 2018

Endorsements
I proudly endorse SONOR drums, SABIAN cymbals, VIC FIRTH sticks and mallets, REMO heads, ROLAND, Protection Racket Cases, Porter and Davies Tactile Monitoring and Dynasty U.S.A marching percussion.

From the earliest age David adored music; by the age of 5 he was singing and playing small wooden flutes made by his elder brother, at age 7 he was taught singing, piano and flute, winning many flute prizes, but by the age of 13 the saxophone took over his life.

David taught himself the alto saxophone and practiced every day for hours, eventually learning to play two saxophones at once. By the time David reached 17, he was playing in a Traditional Jazz Band and a Rhythm and Blues Band - in a school that only allowed Classical Music, these were three good reasons for David Jackson being marked out as being a bit different from the crowd!

David studied Psychology at St. Andrews University in Scotland and whilst there he played in pubs around four nights every week, working with many local musicians, some of whom later became ‘The Average White Band’.

After graduating, David was drawn back together with old school friends in England and set about a getting a recording deal with a band in Oxford and after a year of struggle, David got a call from Judge Smith, a founder member of Van der Graaf Generator. In London, David soon met Peter Hammill and was soon drawn into the most perfect band for his writing and quite unique style of playing saxophones and flutes.

Between 1969 and 1972, Van der Graaf Generator saw remarkable success receiving universal acclaim and found the band on the road playing hundreds of concerts across Europe and recording albums for a growing progressive rock audience. The band broken up in 1972 but reformed in 1975 (and again in 2005). In between times gave David the chance to settle down and start a family.

During 1981, David trained as a teacher in mathematics and special needs and in 1991, whilst David was leading a music project for disabled people, he discovered Soundbeam which dominated his career for about 27 years. David is now an international consultant in music technology and disability.

The great success of the 2005 re-union of Van der Graaf Generator led to a delightful re-awakening of David’s career as an international Prog Rock musician. He now plays for The David Cross Band and now has a further new project, ‘Cross and Jackson’ bringing violin and sax/flute to the fore!

According to utility bills, the tax man and the police, I am Paul Clark, to everyone else I am Clarky; South East London born of English, Scots and Spanish decent musically educated at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Principally I am a guitarist of the hard rock / neo-classical metal / prog rock genre, once described as ‘an occupational shredder’. I am also a hybrid orchestral composer / producer, session guitarist and educator in the art of "doing guitar stuff what makes folk go nuts in the mosh pit".

I guess I’m most known as the lead guitarist for The David Cross Band, which I auditioned for and subsequently joined in the summer of 1992. I also work for Tolga Kashif at Evolution Media Music as a movie trailer composer / producer.

I’d like to think that I live by two mantras:

“Stupidity is the path to innovation”
“Play every note as if it were your last”

However, I’ve come to realise that these are simply excuses. One is an attempt to justify stupidity and questionable behaviour, the other is a statement of intent that fails to consider if the last note you played was any good.

These should therefore be correlated and so corrected to:

“Stupidity is the Play every path to note innovation as if it were your last”

Which makes far more sense.

Feeling better now..

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